Find Your Kid’s #Passions and #Strengths at Thrively.com

Category: Social Media Social Good Series

Thrively.com

Finding what your kid(s) like to do is among the primary goals of most parents. Yes, we teach values and more but where our kids will end up in their life path is another serious concern we all share. The first tendency – and I am the prime example of it – is to direct our children towards the things we like and/or do well.

Kids and Parents

In many families, there is a legacy of profession or job that carries over generation to generation. In our country’s founding, it was often farming and other manual labor. Now, it varies in more ways than most people can even imagine.

So, what’s a parent to do? Schools teach basic things, but don’t really explore the panoply of opportunities our modern world offers.

On August 7th, 2014 we had a #DadChat that dealt with finding our kids’ passion and strengths. The turnout and the dialogue were incredible. Read the transcript to learn more and see the conversation as it played out. It was clear that this issue is paramount to parents as our schools are most certainly not leading our kids to anything but the tried-and-true. And our world today is anything BUT “tried-and-true.”

Without Passion Kids Struggle

In fact, our world today is harder than it’s been in generations. A recent poll found that the majority of parents fear their kids will fare worse in life than they have – something unprecedented in modern American times. But, it’s true. It IS harder today for our kids to succeed in just about everything.

Did you know that 85% of college grads come back home to live – for extended periods of time? I didn’t know a single friend who came back home to live AT ALL except for visits. Did you?

Consequently, the need for our kids to find their passion and strengths is more important than ever. Passion is the ingredient that will set them apart from their peers. Strengths will be those areas where they’ll have the best chances to succeed. Having both is necessary in today’s competitive world.

Thrively, Passion, and Kids

Thrively brings tools to both our kids and parents. It does so in a user-friendly fashion beginning with free registration and then a free assessment test for our kid(s). That test is a multi-media easy-to-do online test that produces a result that outlines five specific strengths and a wealth of information about aptitude(s).

Okay, take a moment NOW and go register at Thrively.com – remember it’s free and the assessment test is free. This will NOT be the case in the future so take advantage of it now!

Both child and parent can view these results. Then, using other tools on Thrivley, parent and kid(s) can access places to “play” with their particular interests and determine which may or may not be the right fit. Those “places” are organized by proximity to your area and the database is growing every day, currently with hundreds of thousands of options.

Thrively Horizontal

What if you discover that your child has an aptitude for technology and there’s a tech camp in your area? How cool would that be? What if YOU thought your child was destined to be the next Michael Jordan, but instead discover he/she is destined to be the next Michael Buble? And, that his or her instrument might be voice and/or guitar, piano, or the trumpet?

What – and this is the MOST IMPORTANT takeaway from this column – if your kid is destined for other things than you had planned for or wanted for him/her? What if your child is NOT interested or has aptitude in those things you love and do? Aren’t you doing your child a service and a blessing by learning that their love, passion, and strength may be different from yours?

This is what Thrively is ALL ABOUT. It’s an awesome tool. Register now and get your kid(s) to take their (free) assessment test. Let me know what you learn and discover? I want to hear!

  • David Weber

    I can relate to this. I come from a family of coal miners. Growing up in Western PA, it was always assumed that I would go down in the mines as my father and grandfathers had done. Indeed, when I finished high school, I held my diploma in one hand and my union card in the other. It wasn’t July of that year (1970) when I went on my first shift.
    The problem was that ever since I was a boy, I hated and feared little rooms, closets, caves. But in the Number Three mine, at the coal face, I hid the fear and dug.
    Fortunately, my supervisor noticed and suggested I get a white-collar job. Which I did. But I’ll tell you what, I never saw my old man as mad as he was the day that I told him I had claustrophobia and that the mining and the Union affiliation would stop with me.

    • http://www.brucesallan.com Bruce Sallan

      I’m with you @disqus_dU5ulU60s7:disqus – I come from a long line of plumbers…hoses freaked me out!